Airplane Quilt Barn Painting Number 2
 
Airplane Quilt Barn Painting Number 2

State of Utah Alice Merrill Horne Art Collection

Painting

Oil on Canvas

Acrylic on canvas

72 x 72

Utah Indigent Defense Com...

2013

2013.10

Copyright All Years. Utah Division of Arts & Museums. All Rights Reserved.

View all works by: Jason Metcalf




Prior to my solo exhibition at the (now former) Central Utah Art Center in Ephraim, Utah, I noticed an affinity between the forms of the folk practice of quilt barn paintings, and high modernist geometric abstraction. I remember specifically looking at some barn paintings in Spring City, Utah, and thinking that they were nearly identical to the paintings of Leo Krikorian, a Modernist geometric painter that studied with Josef Albers at Black Mountain College. My interest in these affinities resulted in a switching of the two forms in their respective places of architecture. Although of a differing provenance, their geometric formal relationships appeared equal, and I was interested in the potential of each to take on the other's talismanic or theoretical significance respectively. I thus placed quilt barn paintings on canvas in the white cube, and geometric abstractions on plywood affixed to barns in the space of the pastoral. The painting, “Airplane Quilt Block Painting No. II”, is an extension of this project, and is an adaptation of one of the original paintings that hung at CUAC for the first exhibition in this series.

This work was featured in the March, 2014 Visual Arts Newsletter: "The Collection Acquisitions Committee recently selected Jason Metcalf's work, Airplane Quilt Barn Painting No. II, for purchase and inclusion into the State Fine Art Collection.

Metcalf says, "I noticed an affinity between the forms of the folk practice of quilt barn paintings, and high modernist geometric abstraction. I remember specifically looking at some barn paintings in Spring City, Utah, and thinking that they were nearly identical to the paintings of Leo Krikorian, a Modernist geometric painter that studied with Josef Albers at Black Mountain College. My interest in these affinities resulted in a switching of the two forms in their respective places of architecture. Although of a differing provenance, their geometric formal relationships appeared equal, and I was interested in the potential of each to take on the other's talismanic or theoretical significance respectively. I thus placed quilt barn paintings on canvas in the white cube, and geometric abstractions on plywood affixed to barns in the space of the pastoral. ""